Meet our Assistant Editor, Drew Krepp! Drew is a first-year fiction student in the UNCW MFA program. We love him and we knew you would too, so we asked him  a few questions so y’all could get to know him:
Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? “Hemingway. Since the seventh grade. There are others that come close- foremost among them being Fitzgerald and Steinbeck- but my favorite has been Hemingway ever since it stopped being Beverly Cleary. I read mostly books by dead people, but I’ll take a look at anything.”
Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”If I’m counting correctly, I’ve lived in 16 different buildings and on one boat in 9 different cities and towns, all of them in  East Coast states. The farthest I’ve lived from the ocean was 179 miles. The closest- the place where I live now- is 317 feet.”
Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “’The Tree’ by Benjamin Percy, appropriately found in the Brutality Issue (#8). There’s something about a jealous and malevolent tree that I can’t get out of my head.” 
Something random? ”The pinky finger on my right hand is at least a half-inch shorter than the one on my left hand. I’ve no idea why.”
And that, dear readers, is Drew in 4 questions and a picture (BONUS: There’s a cute baby in it)! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!

Meet our Assistant Editor, Drew Krepp! Drew is a first-year fiction student in the UNCW MFA program. We love him and we knew you would too, so we asked him  a few questions so y’all could get to know him:

Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like?Hemingway. Since the seventh grade. There are others that come close- foremost among them being Fitzgerald and Steinbeck- but my favorite has been Hemingway ever since it stopped being Beverly Cleary. I read mostly books by dead people, but I’ll take a look at anything.”

Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”If I’m counting correctly, I’ve lived in 16 different buildings and on one boat in 9 different cities and towns, all of them in  East Coast states. The farthest I’ve lived from the ocean was 179 miles. The closest- the place where I live now- is 317 feet.”

Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “’The Tree’ by Benjamin Percy, appropriately found in the Brutality Issue (#8). There’s something about a jealous and malevolent tree that I can’t get out of my head.” 

Something random? ”The pinky finger on my right hand is at least a half-inch shorter than the one on my left hand. I’ve no idea why.”


And that, dear readers, is Drew in 4 questions and a picture (BONUS: There’s a cute baby in it)! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!


Meet our Advisory Editor, Meg Reid! Meg is an alumna of the UNCW MFA program. We love her and we knew you would too, so we asked her a few questions so y’all could get to know her:
Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? “My favorite author is Joan Didion (in particular, Slouching Towards Bethlehem & The White Album), but lately I’ve been rereading John Jeremiah Sullivan’s Pulphead, and Jonathan Franzen’s fiction and nonfiction (Freedom and The Discomfort Zone). Favorite journals include The Believer, The Oxford American, Tin House—any journal where fantastic writing and thoughtful design converge. The Common is beautiful newcomer.”
Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”I lived for fifteen years in Maine, where the resident moose population (over 76k, in rough estimates) is over triple the human population of our capital city, Augusta (19k).”
Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “I think Terry Tempest William’s A Disturbance of Birds from our Sex & Death issue is one of the most powerful pieces of nonfiction we’ve published. Also, Jill Sisson-Quinn’s Sign Here If You Exist. I found this piece (on death, rebirth and enormous moths) as a submission and heartily championed it through the editorial process. I was excited to do an interview with Jill for our website last spring.” 
Something random? ” I’m a very lost Canadian, which means when people walk into me, I apologize. Also, I’ve been told my pronunciation of vowels is very suspect.”
And that, dear readers, is Meg in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!

Meet our Advisory Editor, Meg Reid! Meg is an alumna of the UNCW MFA program. We love her and we knew you would too, so we asked her a few questions so y’all could get to know her:

Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like?My favorite author is Joan Didion (in particular, Slouching Towards Bethlehem & The White Album), but lately I’ve been rereading John Jeremiah Sullivan’s Pulphead, and Jonathan Franzen’s fiction and nonfiction (Freedom and The Discomfort Zone). Favorite journals include The Believer, The Oxford American, Tin House—any journal where fantastic writing and thoughtful design converge. The Common is beautiful newcomer.”

Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”I lived for fifteen years in Maine, where the resident moose population (over 76k, in rough estimates) is over triple the human population of our capital city, Augusta (19k).”

Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “I think Terry Tempest William’s A Disturbance of Birds from our Sex & Death issue is one of the most powerful pieces of nonfiction we’ve published. Also, Jill Sisson-Quinn’s Sign Here If You Exist. I found this piece (on death, rebirth and enormous moths) as a submission and heartily championed it through the editorial process. I was excited to do an interview with Jill for our website last spring.” 

Something random? ” I’m a very lost Canadian, which means when people walk into me, I apologize. Also, I’ve been told my pronunciation of vowels is very suspect.”


And that, dear readers, is Meg in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!

Orion: All Wet and Shine

orionmagazine:

It sounds like the cracks and clicks of the house settling
as the room warms in morning, it sounds like a fan
whispered up. It tastes of wood smoke—sweet and then stale.
It looks like the curve of a mountain
under streaked sky, and everything pale blue
just before sunrise, everything translucent,
even stone. The stone is blue, it tastes, after all,

Congrats! We’re really lucky to have Cynthia Huntington here now as a visiting writer!

thepenguinpress:

The 2012 National Book Award Finalists were announced this morning. Some familiar names made the cut, plus a few debuts. 
FICTION
Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her (Riverhead Books, a member of Penguin Group USA, Inc.)
Dave Eggers, A Hologram for the King (McSweeney’s Books)
Louise Erdrich, The Round House (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)
Ben Fountain, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)
Kevin Powers, The Yellow Birds (Little, Brown and Company)

NONFICTION
Anne Applebaum, Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1945-1956 (Doubleday)
Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity (Random House)
Robert A. Caro, The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson, Volume 4 (Knopf)
Domingo Martinez, The Boy Kings of Texas (Lyons Press, an imprint of Globe Pequot Press)
Anthony Shadid, House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
POETRY
David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations (University of Chicago Press)
Cynthia Huntington, Heavenly Bodies (Southern Illinois University Press)
Tim Seibles, Fast Animal (Etruscan Press)
Alan Shapiro, Night of the Republic (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
Susan Wheeler, Meme (University of Iowa Press)
YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE
William Alexander, Goblin Secrets (Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
Carrie Arcos, Out of Reach (Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
Patricia McCormick, Never Fall Down (Balzer+Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)
Eliot Schrefer, Endangered (Scholastic)
Steve Sheinkin, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon(Flash Point, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press)

Past Ecotone contributors Ben Fountain and Alan Shapiro representing!! 

thepenguinpress:

The 2012 National Book Award Finalists were announced this morning. Some familiar names made the cut, plus a few debuts. 

FICTION

Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her (Riverhead Books, a member of Penguin Group USA, Inc.)

Dave Eggers, A Hologram for the King (McSweeney’s Books)

Louise Erdrich, The Round House (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

Ben Fountain, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

Kevin Powers, The Yellow Birds (Little, Brown and Company)


NONFICTION

Anne Applebaum, Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1945-1956 (Doubleday)

Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity (Random House)

Robert A. Caro, The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson, Volume 4 (Knopf)

Domingo Martinez, The Boy Kings of Texas (Lyons Press, an imprint of Globe Pequot Press)

Anthony Shadid, House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

POETRY

David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations (University of Chicago Press)

Cynthia Huntington, Heavenly Bodies (Southern Illinois University Press)

Tim Seibles, Fast Animal (Etruscan Press)

Alan Shapiro, Night of the Republic (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Susan Wheeler, Meme (University of Iowa Press)

YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE

William Alexander, Goblin Secrets (Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of 
Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)

Carrie Arcos, Out of Reach (Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)

Patricia McCormick, Never Fall Down (Balzer+Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

Eliot Schrefer, Endangered (Scholastic)

Steve Sheinkin, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon
(Flash Point, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press)

Past Ecotone contributors Ben Fountain and Alan Shapiro representing!! 

Meet our Managing Editor, Sally J. Johnson! Sally is a 2nd-year poet in the MFA program at UNCW. We love her and we knew you would too, so we asked her a few questions so y’all could get to know her:
Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? ”I love Faulkner, Whitman, Plath, Hemmingway, O’Connor, and Capote. Obsessed with John Rybicki, Kim Addonizio, Dean Young, and Quan Barry. I love Barbara Kingsolver’s Poisonwood Bible.Right now I’m reading a ton of Anne Sexton and the 20 archived issues of Ploughshares I just ordered.”
Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”When I went to visit Prague I fell in love with this bridge there that was covered in locks. The rumor went: you’d place a lock there with your lover and throw away the key, cementing your destiny with them. When I moved to Wilmington, NC, I discovered a fence where people have hooked up loose keys. I don’t know the reason, but I like to think it’s all those promises on display.”
Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “I’m in total heart-break love with those ‘Six Poems by Children’ John Rybicki gave us for the Happiness Issue.” 
Something random? ”My family has a tortoise right now. His name is Spartacus. We used to have one named Izzo but he ran away. 
And that, dear readers, is Sally in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned! 

Meet our Managing Editor, Sally J. Johnson! Sally is a 2nd-year poet in the MFA program at UNCW. We love her and we knew you would too, so we asked her a few questions so y’all could get to know her:

Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? ”I love Faulkner, Whitman, Plath, Hemmingway, O’Connor, and Capote. Obsessed with John Rybicki, Kim Addonizio, Dean Young, and Quan Barry. I love Barbara Kingsolver’s Poisonwood Bible.Right now I’m reading a ton of Anne Sexton and the 20 archived issues of Ploughshares I just ordered.”

Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”When I went to visit Prague I fell in love with this bridge there that was covered in locks. The rumor went: you’d place a lock there with your lover and throw away the key, cementing your destiny with them. When I moved to Wilmington, NC, I discovered a fence where people have hooked up loose keys. I don’t know the reason, but I like to think it’s all those promises on display.”

Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “I’m in total heart-break love with those ‘Six Poems by Children’ John Rybicki gave us for the Happiness Issue.” 

Something random? ”My family has a tortoise right now. His name is Spartacus. We used to have one named Izzo but he ran away. 


And that, dear readers, is Sally in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned! 





Meet our Nonfiction Editor, Carson Vaughan! Carson is a 2nd-year nonfiction writer in the MFA program at UNCW. We love him and we knew you would too, so we asked him a few questions so y’all could get to know him:
Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? “I’m a sucker for the type of journalism that fills space in the back pages of magazines like Esquire and GQ, stories that would blow the peruser’s mind if only he could make it past the bikini-clad sex goddess gracing the cover. I’m a huge fan of Gay Talese, Tom Junod, John Jeremiah Sullivan and many of the more traditional journalists, too, like Timothy Egan and my former professor Joe Starita.” 
Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”The older I get, the more intensely I find myself writing and talking about Nebraska. As a kid I abhorred “The Good Life,” disparaged it, pretended like I was too good for my own hometown. But now that I’m trying to write about it, I’m terrified of leaving the wrong impression, of painting a portrait that anyone might misconstrue as “simple.” Because If there’s one thing I’ve come to understand about Nebraska, it’s that there’s nothing simple about it.”
Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “I really loved the reclamation piece by Dino Buzzatti, “The Colomber,” published in the Spring 2012 issue.”
Something random? “There was once a sweet old lady who sat in a rocking chair on her porch every afternoon. Without fail, every time I passed her on the sidewalk, she would smile, wave and say, “Looks like it’s goin’ rain.” I still walk the same route, but the chair’s been empty for months.”
And that, dear readers, is Carson in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!

Meet our Nonfiction Editor, Carson Vaughan! Carson is a 2nd-year nonfiction writer in the MFA program at UNCW. We love him and we knew you would too, so we asked him a few questions so y’all could get to know him:

Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? “I’m a sucker for the type of journalism that fills space in the back pages of magazines like Esquire and GQ, stories that would blow the peruser’s mind if only he could make it past the bikini-clad sex goddess gracing the cover. I’m a huge fan of Gay Talese, Tom Junod, John Jeremiah Sullivan and many of the more traditional journalists, too, like Timothy Egan and my former professor Joe Starita.” 

Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: ”The older I get, the more intensely I find myself writing and talking about Nebraska. As a kid I abhorred “The Good Life,” disparaged it, pretended like I was too good for my own hometown. But now that I’m trying to write about it, I’m terrified of leaving the wrong impression, of painting a portrait that anyone might misconstrue as “simple.” Because If there’s one thing I’ve come to understand about Nebraska, it’s that there’s nothing simple about it.”

Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “I really loved the reclamation piece by Dino Buzzatti, “The Colomber,” published in the Spring 2012 issue.”

Something random? “There was once a sweet old lady who sat in a rocking chair on her porch every afternoon. Without fail, every time I passed her on the sidewalk, she would smile, wave and say, “Looks like it’s goin’ rain.” I still walk the same route, but the chair’s been empty for months.

And that, dear readers, is Carson in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!

riverheadbooks:

Emma Straub’s youngest fan! 

How cute are we!? Start ‘em young!

riverheadbooks:

Emma Straub’s youngest fan! 

How cute are we!? Start ‘em young!

poetrysince1912:

In celebration of T.S. Eliot’s birthday, his typescript of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” which appeared in the June 1915 issue of Poetry.

Saweeet! So many birthdays this month! T.S. Eliot, happy birthday to you!

poetrysince1912:

In celebration of T.S. Eliot’s birthday, his typescript of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” which appeared in the June 1915 issue of Poetry.

Saweeet! So many birthdays this month! T.S. Eliot, happy birthday to you!

A Happy Birthday to William Faulkner

penamerican:

photo: 1947, Henri Cartier-Bresson

“Only Southerners have taken horsewhips and pistols to editors about the treatment or maltreatment of their manuscript. This—the actual pistols—was in the old days, of course, we no longer succumb to the impulse. But it is still there, within us.”

– from the Introduction to The Sound and the Fury

Fun fact: Our managing editor is exactly the same height as Faulkner was. A happy birthday to William Faulkner, a man whose only short(ish) stature was in height.

penamerican:

Celebrating the real mind behind Johnny Cash’s hit “A Boy Named Sue”


Happy Birthday Shel Silverstein!


Meet our Fiction Editor, Nicola DeRobertis-Theye! Nicola is a 2nd-year nonfiction writer in the MFA program at UNCW. We love her and we knew you would too, so we asked her a few questions so y’all could get to know her:
Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? “I have dozens of favorite authors, but a preliminary list would go something like: Michael Ondaatje, WG Sebald, Margaret Atwood, Roberto Bolano, EM Forster, Nicole Kraus, Milan Kundera, Haruki Murakami, Kiran Desai, Salman Rushdie, Edith Wharton, JD Salinger…but the list could be endless.”
Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: “I grew up in Oakland, CA and in the first five years of my life lived through the 89 Loma Prieta earthquake and the 91 Oakland Hills fire, which among other structures burned down my house. I’m sure this early exposure to natural disasters means something about my psyche.”
Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “Again a hard question! I absolutely loved Peter La Salle’s “Tell me about Nerval” but the stories we’ve published by Lauren Groff, Kevin Wilson and Robert Olen Butler have also blown my mind.”
Something random? “It’s an untested theory, but I’m not sure I could live in a place where I couldn’t see the ocean.”  And that, dear readers, is Nicola in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!

Meet our Fiction Editor, Nicola DeRobertis-Theye! Nicola is a 2nd-year nonfiction writer in the MFA program at UNCW. We love her and we knew you would too, so we asked her a few questions so y’all could get to know her:

Favorite author, book, journal? What do you like? “I have dozens of favorite authors, but a preliminary list would go something like: Michael Ondaatje, WG Sebald, Margaret Atwood, Roberto Bolano, EM Forster, Nicole Kraus, Milan Kundera, Haruki Murakami, Kiran Desai, Salman Rushdie, Edith Wharton, JD Salinger…but the list could be endless.”

Hit us with a place-based factoid/story about yourself: “I grew up in Oakland, CA and in the first five years of my life lived through the 89 Loma Prieta earthquake and the 91 Oakland Hills fire, which among other structures burned down my house. I’m sure this early exposure to natural disasters means something about my psyche.”

Your favorite thing Ecotone ever published? “Again a hard question! I absolutely loved Peter La Salle’s “Tell me about Nerval” but the stories we’ve published by Lauren Groff, Kevin Wilson and Robert Olen Butler have also blown my mind.”

Something random? “It’s an untested theory, but I’m not sure I could live in a place where I couldn’t see the ocean.

And that, dear readers, is Nicola in 4 questions and a picture! Want to meet the rest of our staff? Stay tuned!
I don’t want readers to approve of my characters. I want them to feel implicated by them. It’s the weakness that makes these characters human, and makes me love them.
These photographs of albatross chicks were made on Midway Atoll, a tiny stretch of sand and coral near the middle of the north Pacific. The nesting babies are fed bellies-full of plastic by their parents, who soar out over the vast polluted ocean and collect what looks to them like food to bring back to their young. On this diet of human trash, every year tens of thousands of albatross chicks die on Midway from starvation, toxicity, and choking.
To document this phenomenon as faithfully as possible, none of the plastic in any of these photographs was moved, placed, manipulated, arranged, or altered in any way. These images depict the untouched stomach contents of baby birds in one of the world’s most remote marine sanctuaries, more than two thousand miles from the nearest continent.
 

See them all here.

These photographs of albatross chicks were made on Midway Atoll, a tiny stretch of sand and coral near the middle of the north Pacific. The nesting babies are fed bellies-full of plastic by their parents, who soar out over the vast polluted ocean and collect what looks to them like food to bring back to their young. On this diet of human trash, every year tens of thousands of albatross chicks die on Midway from starvation, toxicity, and choking.

To document this phenomenon as faithfully as possible, none of the plastic in any of these photographs was moved, placed, manipulated, arranged, or altered in any way. These images depict the untouched stomach contents of baby birds in one of the world’s most remote marine sanctuaries, more than two thousand miles from the nearest continent.
 
See them all here.
Dinner with Updike?

Check out Bill and Dave’s Cocktail Hour to experience dinner with Updike.

betype:

Grafisk Anstalt&nbsp

love, love, love.